Friday, October 9, 2009

Short Takes: Book Giveaway, Personal Debts Rising, and Negotiation by Overload

1. To enter the draw to win one of four copies of the book The Secret Language of Money by David Krueger and John David Mann, send an email with the subject “Book” to the address shown on the upper right corner of this blog. The draw will close Tuesday October 13 at noon. I will contact the winners to get postal addresses.

2. Big Cajun Man reports that Canadians’ personal debt is rising at a record pace.

3. Scott Adams suggests an interesting negotiation strategy.

4. Larry Swedroe explains why you shouldn’t necessarily trust your broker’s recommendations.

5. Larry MacDonald reports that the trend away from mutual funds and into ETFs continues.

6. Canadian Financial DIY finds a fund whose management doesn’t get paid unless the fund makes money.

7. Guest blogger Daniela Garritano has some detailed energy saving tips for cold weather.

8. If your blood pressure isn’t high enough, Million Dollar Journey brings us the salaries of federal politicians.

9. Gail Vaz-Oxlade from the television show Til Debt Do Us Part has a new book out called Debt-Free Forever.

5 comments:

  1. Thanks for the mention and enjoy the Turkey, hopefully it doesn't taste like fiberglass.

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  2. Hi Michael, thanks for the link but ... as you will see from my comment in reply to Preet's comment, I've had to change my tune from praise to condemnation. There's no real benefit, indeed you would be likely to end up paying more in fees over an extended period of years. Another object lesson in how the surface idea sounds good but one must look closely at how it can work in practice.

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  3. Canadian Investor: This doesn't necessarily mean that the idea is wrong. It's just that this particular fund used a formula that is too rich.

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  4. Thanks for the mention Michael. It seems that most of my readers feel that federal politicians are paid fairly.

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  5. MDJ: Based on my very limited sample, people are either outraged or care little. Personally, I just think that the pay is insignificant compared to the amount of public money they control. How they manage that money matters far more than how much they get paid.

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