Friday, January 14, 2011

Short Takes: Major Insider-Trading Case, Self-Banned Gamblers, and more

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has charged four people in a huge insider-trading case.  (The web page containing this story has disappeared.)

Bill Mann reports that Ontario will be using new facial-recognition technology to help problem gamblers stay out of casinos.

Canada Mortgage News explains how banks are playing with the numbers to pump up penalties for breaking a mortgage.

Rob Carrick explains why those in a low marginal tax bracket are better off saving in a TFSA than in an RRSP.

Larry MacDonald (this web page has disappeared) reports on a link between a person’s debt level and exposure to media.

Potato has an interesting collection of alleged China-based stock frauds.

Canadian Capitalist reports on more evidence that currency hedging may not be the best idea.

Preet Banerjee explains what is worth $5400 per hour to him.

Big Cajun Man takes a look back at some financial decisions he’d like to change.

Mike Holman is calling for the Canadian government to unlock locked-in retirement accounts (LIRAs). A LIRA is like an RRSP except with restrictions that make you leave it alone until you hit retirement age. My wife and I each have one of these and life would be a little simpler if we could just combine them with our RRSP accounts, but I’m not as passionate about this issue as Mike is.

Million Dollar Journey gives himself a report card on his 2010 financial goals.

Boomer & Echo muses about whether to take a lottery win as a lump-sum payment or spread over time. I’ll worry about that when I win something. I don’t buy tickets but I suppose I could be awarded a prize by mistake.

Financial Highway looks at the evidence that Canada is a haven for investment swindlers.


Larry Swedroe doesn’t buy the argument that the active-share measurement identifies good money managers.

5 comments:

  1. Thanks for the mention, and have a great weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for the mention Michael. It is unbelievable how widespread insider trading seems to be (with the caveat that none of these cases have been proven in court), especially in the tech sector.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for the mention, glad to see a few more bottom feeding inside traders get the business!

    ReplyDelete
  4. You may never win the lottery, but there's always the opportunity to get millions of dollars as a reward for helping a Nigerian prince retrieve his sequestered wealth.

    ReplyDelete