Friday, March 1, 2013

Short Takes: High-Interest Savings Accounts, Bogus Investor Surveys, and more

Some late-breaking news:  Rob Carrick's latest round-up included a mention of my post this week on Handling RRSPs and RRIFs for Low-Income Seniors.

Money Smarts does a thorough review of high-interest savings accounts now that Ally is dropping off the map.

Tom Bradley at Steadyhand explains the problems with surveys of investor attitudes toward their financial advisors.

Canadian Couch Potato looks at the research on estimating future stock returns. I’m content to just use long-term historical real stock returns and their volatility as estimates for the future.

The Blunt Bean Counter says you should be careful not to burn the goodwill of someone willing to give you a job reference by having too many employers call the reference.

Canadian Couch Potato explains that while Real-Return Bonds offer inflation protection, they can be volatile in the face of changing interest rates.

Tim Cestnick explains the tax rules for lottery prizes and other types of prizes.

Preet Banerjee interviews an investor who left his advisor and went the DIY route.

My Own Advisor explains that an important part of the RRSP vs. TFSA debate is what you do with income tax refunds.

Million Dollar Journey brings us one investor’s story of turning around his portfolio. While it’s good to be optimistic about your future, it’s dangerous to think that you’re truly done learning about investing. Many active investors are on a permanent cycle of turning around their investments, getting disappointing results, and repeating.

Big Cajun Man takes aim at over-priced balanced mutual funds.

Boomer and Echo tell us about 3 credit card products you should avoid.

5 comments:

  1. Thanks for including me, enjoy heaving the "heart attack" snow

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  2. Thanks for the mention Michael! Have a good weekend.

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  3. Thx for mention. Great job on low income seniors and RRSP/RRIF withdrawal. Way more complicated decision than for my high income clients

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    1. @Mark: Thanks. You're right that once your income gets to the level of full OAS clawback, decisions become simpler.

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  4. Thanks for the mention Michael, enjoy the weekend. Every day is one day closer to spring :)

    Mark

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