Friday, October 25, 2013

Short Takes: Why Women Earn Less, Investing in Football Players, and more

I had a couple of popular posts this week judging by the number of comments:

A New Market for Education

A Retirement Income Strategy

Here are my short takes and some weekend reading:

Freakonomics reports on research into why women earn less than men. The finding that women seem less willing to compete for higher pay is consistent with my experience. Among the most competitive business people I know who have questionable morals and are willing to devote far more than 40 hours per week to their careers, the vast majority are men.

The Blunt Bean Counter looks into investing in NFL football player Arian Foster. I suspect that fans will consistently overpay for shares of professional athletes. Owning a slice of a player might feel good but I doubt that it is likely to be a good investment.

Canadian Capitalist answers a reader question about whether it makes sense to maintain an allocation to bonds.

Canadian Couch Potato has some concrete advice for ETF investors who are looking to do some tax-loss selling.

Larry Swedroe explains how bond dealers hide their cut in the yields they offer.

Big Cajun Man asks when you got your first credit card and discusses how attitudes toward credit cards have changed over generations.

Where Does All My Money Go? interviews a legal expert about what happens to digital assets when you die.

Million Dollar Journey gives an answer to the question of how much money you have to save for early retirement. I think the assumptions used are a little optimistic, but I’m still mulling over what I think is the best answer.

Sandi Martin writes an open letter to the big banks inviting them to blow her mind. I wouldn’t count on banks making any of the suggested changes. To predict business behaviour, it’s better to think of businesses as profit-seeking machines capable of little else instead of thinking of them as collections of people with feelings. However, just reading her letter was cathartic for me.

My Own Advisor bemoans the constant barrage of financial product promotions. It’s easier to make a living convincing people to give you their money than it is to build a better mousetrap.

Gail Vaz-Oxlade tries to knock some financial sense into people who desperately need it. Every so often Gail answers some letters in her blog, and I found this crop of questions and answers particularly entertaining. A couple of quotes: “you and your partner don’t have the good sense God gave a goose” and “make sure you don’t get pregnant.”

5 comments:

  1. Thanks for the inclusion, interesting how Credit and Debt has managed to become something "normal" when it was a "social issue" only 30 years ago? Guess I'm getting older.

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  2. >Among the most competitive business people I know who have questionable morals and are willing to devote far more than 40 hours per week to their careers, the vast majority are men.<

    This was worth a giggle. Do you think "questionable morals" are inextricably linked to higher income?

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    1. @Fred: Good, I was aiming for a giggle :-) I don't know about "inextricably linked" but I've definitely noticed a lot of highly-paid execs with questionable morals.

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  3. It was equally cathartic to write, I assure you! Thanks, Michael.

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  4. Thanks for the mention Michael, always appreciated.

    Hope you had a great weekend,
    Mark

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