Friday, June 5, 2015

Short Takes: Economic Impact of Driverless Cars, Choosing Risk Levels, and more

Here are my posts for the past two weeks:

“I Don’t Pay Any Fees”

Climate Change Mutual Finds

The Wrong Investing Goals

The Two-Income Trap 

Here are some short takes and some weekend reading:

Zack Kanter has some fascinating predictions about how driverless cars will change our economy and completely reshape the way we live.

Dan Ariely has a very interesting take on how to choose the level of risk in your investment portfolio. He’s no fan of risk questionnaires.

Malcolm Hamilton says the Ontario government is wrong about Canadians’ savings rate and that the new ORPP is not a good idea.

Life Insurance Canada has some excellent suggestions for improving the life insurance industry. This plain-spoken piece will open your eyes to some of the risks associated with life insurance.

Gail Vaz-Oxlade explains just how expensive overdraft protection can be. She has a very direct style, and her recommendations include “If you think that sounds like too much work, you’re a dope.” My solution is to choose a minimum to keep in my account, like $2000, and I think of it as overdraft if I go below this amount. This way, I never need real overdraft protection.

Andrew Hallam explains a study into how money affects our morality and the implications for financial advisors.

Canadian Couch Potato calls out Google Finance for a number of types of misleading financial data.

Tom Bradley at Steadyhand has some sound thinking on investing and debt for the young.

Big Cajun Man celebrates the end of 3-year cell phone contracts.

Boomer and Echo call for city councils to ban door-to-door sales.

My Own Advisor says planning to live off dividends is a viable retirement strategy. This depends on the investments and the nature of the dividends or distributions. Some income funds have distributions that don’t increase with inflation and aren’t sustainable even in constant dollars. On the other side, many portfolios produce dividends as low as 2% per year, which is overly conservative.

The Blunt Bean Counter has some financial and tax planning advice for the terminally ill. This continues with part 2.

2 comments:

  1. If the Canadian cell industry was opened up we would have even better deals, but I don't think the CRTC will do that any time soon.

    Thanks for the inclusion this week.

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  2. My portfolio with a mix of stocks and ETFs is yielding about 4% right now. I think what I think I will do (live off some dividends) vs. what will actually happen in 10-15 are different things. Life tends to be that way doesn't it?

    Thanks for the comments and support Michael, hope your golf game is in fine form.

    Cheers,
    Mark

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