Friday, January 9, 2015

Short Takes: Useless Forecasts, Stock Picking Risk, and more

Here are my posts for this week:

Security Analysis

My Investment Record to 2014

The Dumbest Argument for Dividend Paying Stocks

Here are some short takes and some weekend reading:

Canadian Couch Potato explains just how useless and dangerous financial forecasters are. Amusingly, I saw the following ad above the article: “Gold Price Forecast: Where We Are and Where We Are Going.” This happens on my blog as well sometimes.

Larry Swedroe explains why individual stocks are riskier than they appear.

Morningstar reports on a new fund in Canada that is exempted from U.S. dividend withholding taxes. I wonder if an ETF could ever do the same thing. If possible, this would pave the way for an index ETF of U.S. stocks that could only be held in an RRSP or RRIF and could be denominated in Canadian dollars.

Celebrating Financial Freedom has a message for people with balances on their credit cards: the 7 huge credit card lies we tell ourselves.

My Own Advisor lists his personal financial goals for 2015. I found it interesting that he chose not to list RRSP contributions because they are on auto-pilot. This speaks to how painless saving can be when it comes off the top of your pay automatically.

Big Cajun Man made me laugh with his interpretation of the Chinese year of the Ram, but the picture of a computer’s RAM seemed to be only in the version of this article in his feed. He’s no fan of New Year’s resolutions, but he’s got a few financial matters you should be thinking about for the New Year.

Boomer and Echo suggest some ideas for saving more money including the mind game of saving $52 the first week of the year, then $51 the second week, and so on until you only have to save $1 in the last week. I used to use this for exercises I didn’t like: a set of 10, then 9, 8, and on down to 1.

3 comments:

  1. Yeh, this whole "featured image" thing is a quandary for me, but the RAM graphic is also available on my January 1st post as well (for those curious). Thanks for the inclusion this week, hopefully it will get warmer (or we will be in a warmer place, take your choice).

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  2. I figured that the reverse money saving challenge was a neat mind trick to help capture the initial interest of saving now with the realities of higher expenses at the end of the year. Also works for push-ups and sit-ups :)

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  3. Outlining the flawed argument for dividends stocks was good Michael, you have a very objective view on finances. A good thing.

    Thanks for the mention and hope you are enjoying your weekend.

    Mark

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