Friday, March 11, 2011

Short Takes: Inheritance Horror Story, Patient Car Buying, and more

The Globe and Mail tells a real inheritance horror story. This kind of story makes me think that I’ll want to give away at least some of my money before I die.

A Loonie Saved has an interesting approach to buying a car.

Wealthy Boomer has put together quite a collection of strong opinions on the Financial Literacy Task Force.

Squawkfox thinks that it rarely makes sense to agree to work for free.

Preet Banerjee says that part of the reason we get so fired up about gasoline prices is that they are so visible.

Rob Carrick explains that it makes sense to shop around for car and house insurance rather than being too loyal.

Canadian Capitalist says that insurance premiums are going up sharply again.

Money Smarts breaks down the different types of financial advisors.

Larry MacDonald (this web page has disappeared) looks at the battle between web sites with real content and sites that use good search engine optimization (SEO). I sure hope real content comes out ahead.

Boomer & Echo have some great house selling tips.

Big Cajun Man invites his readers to join him in some personal financial challenges.

Retire Happy has some tax tips from Blunt Bean Counter that you won’t find in most lists of tax tips.

Million Dollar Journey looks at the economics of painting a room yourself or hiring a painter.

8 comments:

  1. Thanks for the mention, and have a great weekend!

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  2. Thanks for the inclusion this week.

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  3. I forgot to link to the inheritance horror story - I agree, what an awful story.

    I wonder if there will be lawsuits? The article mentioned that if the estate had gone through probate, this would have been avoided.

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  4. The Blunt Bean CounterMarch 11, 2011 at 11:37 AM

    Thanks for the indirect link via Jim.

    The inheritance story left out one of the key issues, how did the trustee access funds without probate. Anyone who has dealth with an estate knows the financial institutions request multiple documents including probate. Thus,the trustee must have had some prior authorization to do what he did.

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  5. @Mike and @Blunt Bean Counter: While reading the inheritance article, I had the vague feeling that some crucial details were left out. If the trustee had some sort of prior authorization that would definitely fill in some gaps.

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  6. I always wonder why these rich people don't give it all away while they're still alive. That's what Chuck Feeney's been doing with his billions for years and always speaks well about it. Quite apart from the risk of your snot-nosed protegee turning thieving sociopath, surely there must be a huge sense of pride and achievement in seeing your millions spent on building schools or whatever in your lifetime - I know I feel great giving a few hundred bucks to the WWF!

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  7. @Guinness416: Giving money away while I'm still alive makes sense to me. An exception I can think of is when a wealthy person has all his money tied up owning a business and he'd like to pass the business on to a child. In this case he can't give his money away a piece at a time.

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  8. Belated thanks for the mention Michael!

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